Home » Archive

Articles in the Browsers Category

Browsers, Computer Lab, Digital Media Lab, Featured, Technology, Web 2.0, Websites »

[6 Apr 2013 | No Comment | ]

Browsers3Some of you may or may not know that the Internet Explorer is not the only web browser available to use when browsing the internet, there are a few other web browsers that can be used to surf the internet.  The PC computers in the Skokie Public Library have 3 web browsers installed, they are Internet Explorer, FireFox and Chrome.  The Digital Media Lab iMacs have Safari, Firefox and Chrome installed.  All of these web browsers have very much the same basic functionalities for web surfing.  Internet Explorer is made by Microsoft, Safari is made by Apple, Chrome is made by Google and Firefox is made by Mozilla.  Feel free to use any one of these when you come in to browse the internet.

Browsers, Computer Lab, Digital Media Lab, Online, Productivity, Technology, Web 2.0, Websites »

[26 Feb 2012 | No Comment | ]

 

Part 3: HTTP Versus HTTPS

When doing online banking or making online purchases or payments, one quick way to check whether you’re on a secure website connection, is to look at the web address in the top browser window.  Does the URL start with http (hypertext transfer protocol), or https?  Https (hypertext transfer protocol secure) adds an additional level of security, beyond http, with SSL (secure sockets layer).

Https provides this extra encryption layer to create a secure channel for your communication, even if your side is insecure.  This prevents eavesdropping by third parties.  While not infallible, https is used by banks and credit card payment websites.  Always check for https before entering sensitive information into a website.

For more information check out these short articles:
BizTech: HTTP vs. HTTPS
WiseGEEK: What is the Difference Between http and https?
Digital Purview: HTTP vs. HTTPS

Browsers, Computer Lab, Digital Media Lab, Online, Productivity, Technology, Web 2.0, Websites »

[26 Feb 2012 | No Comment | ]

 

Part 3: HTTP Versus HTTPS

When doing online banking or making online purchases or payments, one quick way to check whether you’re on a secure website connection, is to look at the web address in the top browser window.  Does the URL start with http (hypertext transfer protocol), or https?  Https (hypertext transfer protocol secure) adds an additional level of security, beyond http, with SSL (secure sockets layer).

Https provides this extra encryption layer to create a secure channel for your communication, even if your side is insecure.  This prevents eavesdropping by third parties.  While not infallible, https is used by banks and credit card payment websites.  Always check for https before entering sensitive information into a website.

For more information check out these short articles:
BizTech: HTTP vs. HTTPS
WiseGEEK: What is the Difference Between http and https?
Digital Purview: HTTP vs. HTTPS

Browsers, Computer Lab, Digital Media Lab, Online, Productivity, Search Engines, Technology, Web 2.0, Websites »

[25 Jan 2012 | No Comment | ]

Part 2: Email Account Security

At some point you may have wondered, which free email accounts provide the best online security?

If the most popular free email providers want to stay in business, they need to offer strong security to keep your email private and safe. This includes spam filtering, virus cleaning, and phishing protection, as well as a request to you, the customer, to create a strong password and security question.

The latest versions of Gmail, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail (Windows Live), and FastMail are rated very high for security; to see independent website ratings (and other info) for free Email providers, check out these links:

- Free email providers rated
- Check your email security now
- Super secure free email providers

Browsers, Computer Lab, Digital Media Lab, Online, Productivity, Technology, Web 2.0 »

[13 Dec 2011 | No Comment | ]

Part 1: Password and Login Security 

Find a small sampling of the world’s worst, most easily guessed passwords (below), according to a Forbes magazine article by David Coursey, and lists compiled by SplashData and Imperva, two productivity and security websites.

Is YOURS on the list? Don’t tell anyone, just change it quick!

To come up with a much more secure password, experts (and reformed hackers) recommend that you do the following:

1. Password should contain at least eight characters
2. Password should contain a mix of four different types of characters– upper case letters, lower case letters, numbers, and special characters such as !@#$%^&*,;” If there is only one letter or special character, it should not be the first or last character
3. It should not be a name, a slang word, or any word in the dictionary. Should not include any part of your name or e-mail address
4. Security guru Bruce Schneir recommends turning a sentence into a password. Example: “Now I lay me down to sleep” might become nilmDOWN2s, a 10-character password that won’t be found in any dictionary
5. It’s OK to write down a HINT about your password, and keep in your wallet. Just don’t also include a list of the sites that password works with. Try to use a different password for every site, or least develop a set of passwords that you use at different sites.

password
123456
12345678
qwerty
abc123
monkey
letmein
dragon
baseball
111111
michael
123123
iloveyou
trustno1